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Culture

February 06 2013
30

adventure

The first time the neighborhood hooligans came, it was summer. We never saw them, and if our mild-mannered lapdog heard anything, he kept quiet about it. But in the morning, there were three long gashes in the middle of our backyard trampoline.

The trampoline was a hand-me-down from a relative, and I had mixed feelings about it anyway. It had no safety net, and when my son, Dane (barely three at the time) went sailing around on it with his Dad on summer evenings, I got all tripped up over fear and worst-case-scenarios.

But still – to see it stabbed and gutted like that, knife-torn in the daylight, broke my Mama-heart. [Read the full post here]

(image source – tyler tarver, creationswap)
 

30 comments

  1. You framed this beautifully–with the terror of having a leaping-off point sabotaged, to the eventual invitation to jump. The prose is precise, with details that keep you right there.

    I heard your Mama Heart here, and I reckon the Spirit of Papa God rushed through you with every word.

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  2. Adele

    “There are dishes to do there, too.” I love this line, Addie. I’m going to use it as a mantra when I feel envious of the adventurous lives I assume other people have!

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    • I know! It was a freeing realization for me too when I first understood it. The mundane follows you, no matter how exciting of a place you go. It’s just part of it.

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  3. This, I love.

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  4. Awesome, Addie. Beautiful prose exposing the beautiful truth of God’s Wild Love and the Great Adventure of following Him wherever it may lead us. Nothing is too small, inconsequential or ordinary that He doesn’t inhabit and fill with His grace. Jumping into God’s arms and saying “Yes” to all that He has for us is life’s greatest purpose. It’s what we are born to do. Thank you for this lovely word to refresh, challenge and encourage us to think Big when we live for His Kingdom, no matter what our physical circumstances might be.

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  5. Awesome, Addie. I’m in the ‘burbs too. And I like it. I miss the color of the city. And I can see the disdain in peoples’ eyes when I tell them where I live (though I can also tell they’ve never visited, and possibly do not even know the geographical location of where I live.) And yes, even Christianity is thought to be *better* in the city.

    The problem is the same as those teenagers and the pumpkins. People are desperate for adventure. We cheer when Bilbo leaves his hobbit hole, because nothing in life could be worse than staying in your hobbit hole in hobbit suburbia. True living and faith is out there!

    Reply
    • Yes, I can relate to that feeling that “Christianity is thought to be *better* in the city.” There’s a stigma to living in the suburbs, this idea that you’ve somehow become a sellout. But faith is just faith, wherever you are. It’s hard no matter where you choose to practice it…just different kinds of hard.

      Thanks for the comment and the suburban solidarity. :)

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  6. Yes. I grew up in the suburbs too, and there can be real community and adventure there, as there can be anywhere. I love this, Addie.

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  7. I love the juxtaposition of the trampoline with your last invitation to jump. Beautifully done.

    And thank you, thank you, thank you for the oh-so-important reminder that God is present everywhere. There are dishes to do there, too – yes! May we all learn how to love wildly and live fully right where we are.

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    • Love this note in your comment: “May we all learn how to love wildly and live fully right where we are.” Perfectly summed up. Thanks Jenn.

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  8. *Standing slow clap*

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  9. Lee Eclov

    This was a beautiful thing, which I will pass on to my son. But would it kill you to attribute the trampoline to “my favorite aunt and uncle” instead of “a relative.”

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    • What was I thinking? Clearly an oversight due to the late hour that I was writing this post. 😉 Thanks Uncle Lee.

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  10. Beautiful!!! Thanks for sharing.

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  11. Standing right beside Sarah, clapping. Thanks for this beauty, words that drip both joy and distress — just like life. And life is here in the suburbs, too. . . even the particularly wealthy and exclusive suburb in which God plunked us to live. Many people who live here may actually have someone else wash their dishes, but I gotta tell you, there is plenty of desperation and lots of lostness staring at us here, too. I’m a big believer in adventure – I just never, ever guessed ours would take us to this place at this end of our lives. (Sorry about the trampoline, Addie. And sorry the hooligans can’t find an adventure with more staying power than that.)

    Reply
    • Seriously. (I even left out the part where they came and snipped all of the outdoor lights I had strung in our bushes and along our deck. HOOLIGANS!) Glad I’m not alone in this suburban adventure. May we learn how to live fully alive in his love even here.

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  12. Amen, Addie. I loved growing up and living in the suburbs. Was faith hard-won there at times? Absolutely. But it was all the more beautiful because of that. After all, my suburban existence shaped me into the leap of faith kind of woman I am. Now, living in the city, I see it’s just as easy to get locked into habit and isolation. We have to be intentional no matter where we live.

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    • “We have to be intentional no matter where we live.” Amen. Thanks Leigh.

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  13. You said it, Addie. Wow. Just so good. “Beige-out” is my new favorite expression.

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    • I think I may have read it somewhere and hijacked it, but I can’t remember where I heard it. It’s pretty awesome, right? (And thanks so much.)

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  14. You’ve so put me in my place (in a great way) about the internal rage I feel about being stuck in the suburbs. Even as I sit here reading, I think about my neighbor right next door hurting and in need of love. While I may never really reconcile having to live here for now, I know that I need to be the hands and feet of Christ despite my surroundings.

    Reply
    • I’m sorry your feeling stuck (I can so relate. Not necessarily in the suburbs, but in other places I’ve lived.) For the record, I think it’s an incredible place to practice intentionality…when there’s such a pull to stay within your own house, isolated from one another. If you can learn the art of neighboring here, I think you can carry it with you anywhere. Just my two cents. (So glad this was helpful for you! Thanks for the comment!)

      Reply

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